2018 Governor Debate

KOB-TV New Mexico First 2018 Governor Debate Regional Town Halls Questions

Behavioral health

Our NM mental health system was significantly disrupted in the last four years. Those challenges include support for mental illnesses such as alzheimer's and dementia, as well as behavioral health challenges such as addiction or homelessness. If elected, how do you propose to ensure we have an adequate infrastructure of services for people with a wide array of mental health needs. Tommy Hernandez, Albuquerque Metro (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

New Mexico faces an opioid crisis. In your campaigns you have each shared ideas on treatment for addicts. But the huge needs of children and families of addicts are often overlooked. If elected, what would you do to support these vulnerable family members who are NOT addicted? Melissa Fryzel, Northern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Child protection

Members of our town hall group were highly concerned about the growing number of crimes against children. We understand that the entities charged with protecting children, from the social service agencies to the judicial system, are seriously underfunded. If you become governor, what actions would you favor to increase resources for these critical services. Marcie Martinez, Northern NM (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

Crime

Recidivism rates in New Mexico are higher than most of our neighboring states, with almost 40 percent of incarcerated people becoming repeat offenders. We know our current approach to crime is not working. If elected governor, what intervention programs would you take to reduce recidivism and also prevent crime before it happens? Marla Gorena, Albuquerque Metro (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

Given the state’s high crime rate, what existing programs should be evaluated and reformed to reduce crime in New Mexico? Rhonda Johnson, Southeastern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Economic development

Many people say New Mexico’s tax structure puts the state at a disadvantage to surrounding states. What do you believe are the most problematic areas of our tax system, and why? Donna Owens, Albuquerque Metro (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

What is your plan on business incentives to encourage growth of existing businesses and to attract new ones? Ivey Mcclelland, Albuquerque Metro (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

We see businesses leave and avoid New Mexico as a result of the culture of restrictive regulatory controls. What are your plans to make New Mexico more business-friendly? Vincent Soule, Southeastern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Rural communities often feel left behind, in terms economic development. What specific ideas do you have for stimulating rural economies? Elaine Mayfield, Southeastern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

What do you believe stands in the way of businesses coming to New Mexico, and what is your plan to remove those barriers? Raymond Mondragon, Southeastern NM (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

Infrastructure is essential to rural economic development, but many rural communities believe they do not receive their fair share in resources, such as capital outlay. What do you think is needed to provide sufficient infrastructure to enhance economic development and job opportunities in rural New Mexico? Michael Santistevan, Northern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Education

Given the range of decisions being made by boards of regents throughout the state that have spawned outcry and the perception that faculty and the average everyday student challenges are not considered in these decisions. What is your position on how regents are selected for board of higher education and what would you do to change the decision making process so there is more accountability to students and faculty? Harold Pope, Albuquerque Metro (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Given the Yazzi vs. Martinez ruling in which the state was directed to provide more funds to support public education for underrepresented students, and additional funding, how do you plan to use that funding to support K-12 education such as for Pre-K, before and after school programs and STEM opportunities? Othiamba Umi, Albuquerque Metro (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Given the Yazzi vs. Martinez ruling in which the state was directed to provide more funds to support public education for underrepresented students, and the additional $1.2 billion in state reserves, how do you plan to use that funding for so that our student success outcomes and education ratings improve. Mary Beth Weeks, Albuquerque Metro (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Given the low percentage of children who are enrolled in Pre-K and the correlation between Pre-K education and future student success, what will you do to increase the number qualified Pre-K teachers and early intervention providers? Roiba (Reba) Sanchez, Northern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Given that our graduation rate is one of the lowest in the nation, and many of our students and teachers are without necessary materials and equipment, what will you do to ensure that school districts are held accountable in how funding is used directly to support student success? Christine Roybal, Northern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Given the high vacancy rate of K-12 teachers throughout the state, what do you plan to do to recruit and retain highly qualified teachers? Roiba (Reba) Salazar, Northern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Many people focus only on the problems with education in New Mexico, not what’s working. Please share three specific things you believe are going right. Dawn Bilbrey, Southeastern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

New Mexico’s Public Education Department plays a key role in ensuring classroom teachers have a place at the table. If elected, how will your new Secretary of Education include teachers in decision-making? And, if you have already picked this person, who is it? Tennise Lucas, Southeastern NM (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

Effective institutions

State government positions and services have been downsized over many years, resulting in inadequate staffing for many important public services, such as child-protective services. What is your vision for funding state-government, including staffing and compensation, to ensure New Mexicans receive the services they need. Erica Velarde, Northern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Energy

Now more than ever we are demanding access to clean, affordable energy. As governor how will you incentivize benefits to renewable energy for all New Mexicans? Jose Archuleta, Northern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Energy & Economic development

Our economy and our state budget is heavily dependent on the oil and gas industry. Often we have been presented a false choice between stewarding our environment and building our economy. How can we take care of both? Mark Childs, Albuquerque Metro (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Healthcare

Given the current climate of a lack of behaviorist healthcare services, what will your approach be to increase access to consistent treatment in our state? Kathryn Vaz, Southeastern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Even with federal healthcare reform, many low-income and middle-class New Mexicans are still falling through the cracks. They either can’t afford coverage, or they get stuck with huge bills for co-insurance. How can we ensure that all New Mexicans have access to affordable health care? Fanny Schwarz, Northern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

New Mexico and the nation’s healthcare system is currently built on private healthcare markets. Some people advocate single payer systems as a future reform. Do you favor a potential shift to single-payer, retention of private markets, or another solution? Why do you hold this position? John Garcia, Albuquerque Metro (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Marijuana legalization

Advocates say the legalization of marijuana would increase New Mexico’s tax revenues and reduce incarceration rates. If the legislature were to pass legislation to legalize marijuana, would you sign the legislation? Why or why not? Victor Raigoza, Albuquerque Metro (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

Partisanship

Our town hall group applauded the goal of working across party-lines. If elected, what strategies will you advance to avoid partisanship across the board? Hope Morales, Southeastern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate, but addressed during congressional debate)

Road safety

There are roads so dangerous in southeast New Mexico, I don’t let my friends and family to use them. In fact, school bus drivers won’t use them either. What is your plan to identify and address the most egregious safety corridors in New Mexico? Ann Lynn McIlroy, Southeastern NM (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

If southeast New Mexico had better transportation into our cities that created better accessibility and eased isolation, our economy would be stronger and quality of life would be better. Please share your ideas on how to better connect our state. Woods Houghton, Southeastern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Sanctuary cities

Given the trend of municipalities choosing to become sanctuary cities and not complying with ICE regulations, as governor, what is your stance on this issue? Juliana Halvorson, Southeastern NM (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

Water

Growing up I’ve noticed the water levels in New Mexico’s lakes, rivers and streams have declined substantially. As governor, how would you approach managing our dwindling water supply? Anthony Lopez, Northern NM (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

Through the Rio Grande Compact, New Mexico is forced to share water with other states. As governor how would you deal with the water compact case that is before the U.S. Supreme Court? Theresa Cardenas, Northern NM (Answered at Oct 16 debate)

New Mexico is an arid state. We’re in a drought, we’ll always experience droughts. How will your administration support the role of the office of the state engineer in managing New Mexico’s water? Aron Balok, Southeastern NM (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

New Mexico faces many demands on its dwindling water supply, including past promises exceeding current demand and future needs. What steps will you take to address our water supply, that make sense now and into the future? Elaine Hebard, Albuquerque Metro (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

Weather emergencies

In current times we’re seeing increased extreme weather events, including drought, floods and wildfires. What bold, innovative solutions do you have for our state to be a national leader to adapt to these changes? Denise Tibbets, Albuquerque Metro (Not addressed at Oct 16 debate)

 



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