Background Report: Strengthening Higher Education and Tomorrow’s Workforce Town Hall

Appendix

Appendix A: Institutions of Higher Education and their Governance

TABLE: Higher Education Institutions Established by State Constitution

Institution

Qualified
Electors or Regent

Student
Board
members

Highest Degree Level Awarded

Institution
Type

University of New Mexico

6

1

Ph.D.

Research

New Mexico State University

4

1

Ph.D.

Research

New Mexico Highlands Univers6ity

4

1

Master’s

Comprehensive

Western New Mexico University

4

1

Master’s

Comprehensive

Eastern New Mexico University

4

1

Master’s

Comprehensive

New Mexico Tech

4

1

Ph.D.

Research

Northern New Mexico College

4

1

Bachelor’s

Comprehensive

TABLE: Branch Community Colleges

Institution

Advisory Board

Highest Degree Level Awarded

Eastern New Mexico University – Roswell

5

Associate

Eastern New Mexico University – Ruidoso

5

Associate

New Mexico State University – Alamogordo

5

Associate

New Mexico State University – Carlsbad

5

Associate

New Mexico State University – Dona Ana

6

Associate

New Mexico State University – Grants

5

Associate

University of New Mexico – Gallup

4

Associate

University of New Mexico – Los Alamos

5

Associate

University of New Mexico – Taos

5

Associate

University of New Mexico – Valencia

5

Associate

TABLE: New Mexico Independent Community Colleges

Institution

Board Members
(elected)

Highest Degree
Level Awarded

Clovis Community College

5

Associate

Central New Mexico Community College

7

Associate

Luna Community College

7

Associate

Mesalands Community College

5

Associate

New Mexico Junior College

7

Associate

San Juan College

7

Associate

Santa Fe Community College

5

Associate

Appendix B: Degree Types and Completions

TABLE: Types of Degrees and Credentials (detailed)

Credential

Examples of Majors

How Long

Notes

Associate of Arts (AA)

Business, criminology, early childhood education, hospitality and tourism, graphic arts

2-3 semesters

An AA degree is primarily designed to prepare a student to transfer to a bachelor’s program. At least 50 AA majors are offered from N.M. community colleges.

Associate of Science (AS)

Biotechnology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, pre-health science,

2-3 semesters

An AS degree is designed to prepare a student to transfer to a bachelor’s degree program in a technical, medical or professional field. At least 13 AS majors are offered at N.M. community colleges.

Applied Associate Degrees

Computer programming, culinary arts, heating and air conditioning, paralegal, wind energy, fashion design, gallery management, geospatial information technology

2-3 semesters

Unlike the AA or AS, the applied associate degrees are not intended to transfer to a bachelor’s degree program. These are “career” degrees for students who plan to enter the workforce in a specific occupation right away. At least 60 applied associate majors are offered at N.M. community colleges.

Apprentice-ships

General trades, electrical, carpentry, iron working, plumbing, sheet metal, welding

3 to 5 years

Apprenticeships are blocks of courses generally offered in conjunction with trade organizations. For example, an electrical apprenticeship to become a licensed, union, Journeyman Wireman requires five years, during which students earn wages for on-the-job training.[1] A registered apprenticeship program can increase lifetime earnings by $240,000.[2]

Certificate of Completion

Automotive technology, bookkeeper, carpentry, dental assistant, film crew technician, optical lab technology

1-2 semesters

A certificate of completion, on its own, does not create a college degree. It prepares people to enter specific occupations or upgrade workplace skills. For example, a film crew certificate requires 28 credit hours ranging from production, make-up and sound.

Certificate of Achievement

Brewing technology, community health worker, firefighter, home health aide, truck driving

1 semester or less

A certificate of achievement, on its own, does not create a college degree. It prepares students to enter specific occupations or upgrade workplace skills. For example, a truck driving certificate from CNM can be completed in 14 credit hours that include in-class and highway coursework.

Bachelor’s Degrees

Wide array of over 200 subjects in New Mexico, from architecture to zoology

4 years

Students may enter a bachelor’s program directly or after completing an associate degree. Many, but not all, programs can be completed in 120 credit hours.

Graduate Degrees

Wide array of over 100 master’s and doctoral programs

2-5 years

Students must first complete a bachelor’s degree before beginning a graduate program.

Professional Degrees

Medicine, engineering or law

3-7 years

These specialized advanced degrees focus on specific careers, such as physicians or attorneys.

*Community college degree options drawn from CNM, CCC, Mesalands, NMJC, SJC, SFCC and SIPI. Not all colleges distinguish between types of certificates in their materials. The time to complete a degree is based on 15 credits a semester, but students often do not take that course load.

Table: N.M. Certificates and Degrees, 2016-2017, Awarded by Ethnicity

Certificates

Assoc.

B.A.

M.A.

Post
M.A.
Certificate

Graduate
Certificate

Doctorate

Professional

Total
Degrees
Production
by Ethnicity

Hispanic

5,131

3,826

3,513

788

*

42

35

118

13,457

American
Indian

954

798

337

83

10

*

*

*

2,200

Asian

206

145

180

59

*

*

*

20

618

Black or
African
American

228

229

214

75

*

*

*

*

765

Native
Hawaiian

28

20

17

*

*

*

*

*

69

White

3,295

2,736

2,850

1,017

*

102

85

123

10,214

Two or
More Races

181

163

203

44

*

*

*

13

617

Race/Ethnicity
Unknown

327

263

151

72

*

*

12

10

843

Non-Resident
Alien

81

92

238

262

*

11

77

*

766

Total

10,431

8,272

7,703

2,403

24

183

230

303

29,549

*Data suppressed; fewer than 10 students in this category attained this award.

Appendix C: Changes in Tuition Rates, Public Institutions, 2004-2017

TABLE: N.M. Tuition Data, 2004, 2010, 2018

2-Year Programs

4-year Programs

2004-2005

$1,040

$3,909

2010-2011

$1,325

$5,128

2017-2018

$1,755

$6,921

Percentage difference, 2010 to 2017

32%

35%

Percentage increase, 2004 to 2017

69%

77%

Figure 26: Tuition increases in N.M., 2004-2017

 

Appendix D: Dual Credit Impact Data

TABLE: Remediation Rates for Dual Credit Students vs. All College Students in N.M.

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

UNM, NMSU, and ENMU

Dual credit students

17%

14%

12%

10%

9%

All students

33%

32%

30%

29%

31%

CNM and NMSU-DA

Dual credit students

43%

48%

44%

42%

38%

All students

71%

72%

70%

62%

62%

Source: LESC compilation of data from HED, NMSU, UNM, ENMU, and CNM

Appendix E: Community College Non-credit Workforce Training

The state Legislative Finance Committee says the state spends approximately $8 million a year on direct support for workforce training and development at public community colleges, including adult basic education and literacy.[3]New Mexico allocates funds based on the number of non-credit contact hours they provide. Citing national labor experts, the LFC said community colleges could make better use of state money by paying closer attention to employer needs, particularly by focusing on job listings and other data sources that directly reflect demand.[4]

TABLE: Non-credit Workforce Training at New Mexico Community Colleges (N.M. Association of Community Colleges)

Institution

Student Contact Hours FY 2016-17

CNM

59,099

Clovis

1,165

ENMU Roswell

6,799

ENMU-Ruidoso

8,859

Luna

 

Mesalands

 

NMJC

40,609

NMSU-Alamogordo

 

NMSU-Carlsbad

1,340

NMSU-Carlsbad

1,340

NMSU-DACC

21,058

NMSU-Grants

 

SJC

40,834

SFCC

26,320

UNM-Gallup

16,288

UNM-Los Alamos

1,220

UNM-Taos

1,908

UNM-Valencia

11,193

Total

236,691

Appendix F: Higher Education Related Legislation, 2018 Legislative Session

Below is a list of higher education related legislation introduced in the 30-day, 2018 legislative session. This list provides an example of the types of higher education related legislation introduced rather than a comprehensive list of legislation introduced in recent years.

TABLE: Higher Education Related Legislation, 2018 N.M. Legislative Session

Bill Number

Bill Title

Sponsor

HB 23

Additional high school graduation requirement, prior to graduation students apply to a post-secondary
educational institution, commit to an internship,apprenticeship or military service

Gentry
Ivey-Soto

HB 30

Soft skills programs appropriations

Rehm

HB 114

Pathway to college pilot project

Roybal
Caballero
Morales

HB 265

Alternative teacher license requirements

Salazar
L. Trujillo
Stapleton
C. Trujillo

HB 270/SB 140
(PASSED)

Lottery scholarship awards and tuition costs, designates a fixed amount depending on whether
the institution is a 4-year or community college.

Smith
Montoya
Soules

HB 259

Appropriations for early college high school initiative within UNM Chicano and Chicana studies dept.

Roybal
Caballero

HB 303

Report on Higher Education Economic Development Programs

McCamley

HB 78/SB 53

Career, technical student organizations appropriations

Brown
Dow
Roch
Padilla

HM 48/SM 64
(PASSED)

Central NM Community College Day

Rehm
Hall
Larrañaga
White

SB 10

Health professional loan repayments
through physician fees

Kernan
Stefanics

SB 218

College affordability endowment appropriations

Morales

SB 251

UNM-BBER education and training programstudy for uranium site clean-up

Pinto

SB 258

Contingent transfer of Luna Community College to New Mexico Highlands University

Campos

SJR 1

Nominating board of regents

Steinborn
Moores

SJR 13

Removal of board of regent

Lopez

SM 54 (PASSED)

TRIO programs, encourages high-school students to go on to post-secondary education

Sapien

SM 58 (PASSED)

Community college completion day

Campos

Appendix G: Student-Centered Communication

As noted in Chapter 2, this report’s writers encountered many examples of materials intended to help students but instead used extensive jargon or organized the information poorly. Below are two examples: the first illustrating a cumbersome presentation of information and the second attempting a student-centered delivery. The example is healthcare, but could apply to any profession.

Occupational Data for Healthcare Administration

The Bureau of Labor Statistics created the following presentation of data regarding healthcare jobs.

Is Healthcare the Career for You?

New Mexico First created the following graphic, intended for students in the Las Cruces area, from handouts produced by Bridge of Southern New Mexico. If published, the graphic would include links to the listed resources.

Appendix H: Healthcare Workforce Pipeline Programs

Collaborative Pipeline Programs

Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP) Four Corners Alliance, Pre-Admission Workshop (PAW):[5]The AAIP has a longstanding partnership with the Four Corners Alliance (University of Colorado, University of Utah, UNM, University of Arizona - Tucson, and University of Arizona - Phoenix) to host an annual health career Pre-Admission Workshop (PAW). The PAW brings together AAIP member physicians, American Indian and Alaska Native college students, public health professionals, university admissions professionals and other interested individuals with the goal of providing students with the information and skills necessary to succeed in the medical and health-profession school admission process.

American Indians Into Nursing Collaborative Grant:[6] In 2016, the Indian Health Service (HIS) awarded the UNM College of Nursing a $300,000 grant to train and educate more American Indian and Alaska Native nursing students who will practice at IHS centers in New Mexico and across the country. The three-year grant brings together the UNM College of Nursing, San Juan College and the UNM Center for Native American Health. The partnership provides financial support, mentoring, training and clinical experience to eligible students.

Dream Makers Health Careers Program (DMHCP): Dream Makers is a collaboration between the UNM HSC Office for Diversity and school districts throughout New Mexico. Dream Makers provides middle and high school students with unique opportunities to gain exposure to health professions while strengthening science and math skills. This program aims to stimulate interest in the health professions, especially among underserved and underrepresented populations in New Mexico, and to increase awareness of the urgent need for healthcare workers in our state. Dream Makers provides students the opportunity to realize their abilities, opportunities, and potential for success in the health sciences fields.

New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium (NMNEC):[7] The NMNEC is a consortium of over 26 nursing higher education programs, organizations and individuals throughout the state. The consortium is committed to implementing a common, sustainable statewide nursing curriculum, increasing the number of Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and graduate degrees awarded, and preparing a qualified, diverse and professional nursing workforce particularly in rural areas. Many of the consortium’s objectives can be traced to statewide deliberations that took place in 2008 led by the N.M. Board of Nursing and the N.M. Center for Nursing Excellence.[8]

SUN PATH Consortium:[9]The New Mexico Skill UP Network Pathway Acceleration in Technology and Healthcare (SUN PATH) Consortium, comprised of higher education and industry leaders, has developed programs throughout the state that accelerate students through community college healthcare training programs and directly into the workforce. Over the past three years, SUN PATH has served close to 3,400 students with over 2,300 credentials earned so far. Of those students, over 500 became employed upon completion of their studies, and over 1,260 who were already employed received a wage increase post-enrollment. SUN PATH is a $15 million project funded by the U.S. Department of Labor through the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Initiative (TAACCCT) with the bulk of the funding ending in 2018.

UNM/NMSU Cooperative Pharmacy Program (CPP):[10]The UNM/NMSU Cooperative Pharmacy Program (CPP) is designed to increase the number of pharmacy students from southern New Mexico and that practice in the area. Students selected during their senior year in high school will complete the pre-pharmacy coursework at NMSU, then enter the UNM College of Pharmacy. CPP students will also spend summers participating in pharmacy practice experiences in southern New Mexico. As members of the Pre-Pharmacy Society (PPS), all students receive assistance in applying to the UNM College of Pharmacy or other pharmacy schools. The PPS also provides students with professional development, networking opportunities, academic support and community involvement.

UNM Health Sciences Center Pipeline Programs

Building Outstanding STEM-H Students (BOSS): The mission of BOSS is to engage, inspire, and increase the level of participation of K-12 African American students in STEM-H careers. This is achieved by developing programs and partnerships with local community based organizations with strong STEM-H opportunities and further develop these programs such that all youth have a better appreciation for the contributions of African-Americans in STEM-H achievements. There is clear evidence of the need to engage, inspire and increase the level of access, opportunity and participation of K-12 African-American students in STEM-H educational experiences thereby inspiring these youths to pursue and become leaders in STEM-H fields.

Center for Native American Health-Indigenous Pre-Admission Education for the Health Professions (CNAH-iPrEHP Workshop): The CNAH-iPrEHP assists Native American undergraduates and para-professionals to navigate the higher education admissions process for degree programs available at the UNM Health Sciences Center.

Health Careers Academy (HCA): HCA is an intense and rewarding six-week non-residential program held at the UNM Health Sciences Center for rising high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors. HCA is designed to help strengthen ACT scores and provides dual credit. The program is designed to enhance math, science, language, and critical thinking skills. It also aims to stimulate interest in the health professions, especially among underserved and underrepresented populations in New Mexico, and to increase awareness of the urgent need for healthcare providers in our state. HCA will challenge students by balancing a rigorous academic curriculum with service learning, cultural humility trainings, and health career exploration.

MCAT+/PCAT+/DAT+: These are academically rigorous summer programs that provide an academic learning environment and test preparation for New Mexico residents preparing to take the Medical College Admissions Test, Pharmacy College Admissions Test, or the Dental Admissions Test.

Mental & Behavioral Health Academy (MBHA): Through a partnership with the UNM School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry Center for Rural and Community Behavioral Health, this program provides an opportunity for those interested in mental and behavioral health careers to participate in a hybrid program that includes test preparation, academic enrichment, career explorations, and service learning.

New Mexico Clinical Education Program (ClinEd): A six-week summer program for pre-professional students who wish to apply to the UNM School of Medicine and are seeking to gain clinical experiences in rural and/or medically underserved communities. The program provides middle school through pre-professional students with health career awareness and exploration opportunities, testing preparation, and the chance to develop and hone critical thinking skills in an academically rigorous, culturally responsive, and supportive learning environment

Undergraduate Health Science Enrichment Program (UHSEP): This six-week academically rigorous, residential program at the UNM Health Sciences Center provides an academic learning environment for entering college freshman who are interested in a career as a health professional. UHSEP was designed to meet New Mexico’s needs by training youth to become competitive applicants to enter health professional schools. The program challenges students with a rigorous academic curriculum and provides college credit and developmental support.

Undergraduate Pipeline Network Summer Research Experience: This 10-week summer program seeks to cultivate students' interest in research while helping them attain skills needed to apply for and succeed in post-baccalaureate education. The program provides the opportunity for students to choose from several areas of research the UNM HSC.

UNM School of Medicine BA/MD Program: Under the BA/MD program students earn a baccalaureate degree in a challenging four-year curriculum specifically designed to prepare them for medical school and to practice medicine in New Mexico. Upon graduation eligible students then transition to the UNM School of Medicine to complete their doctor of medicine degree.[11] After completing their medical residency many of these New Mexico students return to practice in New Mexico.[12]

Appendix I: Energy Workforce Resources [13]

In 2005, an NMSU student proposed a “degree option to equip business graduates with a solid and well-rounded knowledge of both the domestic and global energy industries. Graduates, receiving a Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a specialization in Energy Commerce, [would] be prepared to compete for opportunities in the areas of energy finance, accounting, economics, land management and areas involving the trading and marketing of energy commodities.”

At the time, an “all-inclusive approach in presenting applications in all major existing and emerging energy industries” would have set the interdisciplinary Energy Commerce major apart. The curriculum was essentially a “compilation of courses already offered at NMSU and course descriptions from the universities of Texas, Oklahoma and Houston, Texas Tech, Oklahoma State and Tulane. Courses were selected based on survey results, interviews and frequency of course subjects among energy industry-serving universities.”

The bachelor’s degree option was not adopted by NMSU, but the excerpts in this appendix are presented as an example of a non-technical energy major. The proposal grouped together 30 credits of major course requirements and six environment-related credits. Recommended major course requirements were:

  • ACCT 301. Financial Accounting I
  • ACCT 321 (Proposed). Financial Statement Analysis of Energy Companies
  • EC 301 (Proposed). Introduction to Energy Commerce
  • ECON 445 (Proposed). Economic Analysis of Energy Markets
  • ECON/MGT 335. Business and Government
  • FIN 355. Investments
  • FIN/AG E 311. Financial Futures Markets

Lastly, the proposed degree option would have required an additional nine credits from “elective courses that complement the Energy Commerce core, such as Public Utilities Regulation, Real Estate Valuation, and Production and Operations Management. Additional elective courses in Rural Appraisal and Real Estate Principles and Law, for example, give the Energy Commerce student a chance to extend knowledge to succeed as a landman, one who negotiates and prepares leases, researches ownership and drafts contracts.” [14]

Goal: By 2020, better align education and training programs at New Mexico's two- and four-year colleges with current and future energy workforce needs.

  • Develop an ongoing public-private partnership of energy companies, higher-education institutions, national laboratories, K-12 schools, and other public and public-private entities to further STEM learning and prepare New Mexico students for careers in energy.
  • Identify key knowledge, skills, and abilities needed for current and future energy-sector jobs in New Mexico.
  • Catalog existing energy training programs and curriculum available in New Mexico.
  • Identify gaps between education and training programs and employers' reported needs.
  • Develop curriculum, internship/ apprenticeship programs, and job recruitment strategies through a public/private partnership that addresses gaps in training and strengthen existing programs.
  • Prioritize recruitment and retention of well-qualified faculty and instructors with energy-related experience and expertise.
  • Meet at least bi-annually to review progress and address evolving needs.
  • Goal: Through a public-private partnership, create energy career outreach program that reaches 15,000 students annually.
  • Meet at least bi-annually to review progress and address evolving needs.
  • Continue and expand partnerships between higher education institutions, rural and tribal communities.
  • Offer energy-career activities in high schools and enrich classes with energy career content.
  • Develop, distribute, and support the implementation of a one-semester high school energy course to improve energy literacy.
  • Promote energy-related STEM clubs in schools statewide and STEM summer programs and increase student participation.
  • Sponsor a Senate memorial every legislative session to encourage energy career opportunities.
  • Goal: Remove barriers for New Mexican students to enter energy training programs.
  • Develop diverse financial support for energy-related programs and students, including through industry- and trade organization-financed student scholarships, professional internships and research experiences.
  • Recommend revisions to lottery scholarship to reflect needs of both traditional and nontraditional students pursuing energy-related fields of study.

Appendix J: Mean Wage of New Mexico Occupations


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[1] (N.M. Join Apprenticeship and Training Committee; Associated Builders and Contractors of N.M.)

[2] (U.S. Congress, Joint Economic Committee, Foundation for Economic Success, 2017)

[3] (LFC, 2016)

[4] (LFC, 2016)

[5] (Association of American Indian Physicians, n.d.)

[6] (UNM HSC Newsbeat, 2016)

[7] (N.M. Nursing Education Consortium, n.d.)

[8] (New Mexico First, 2008)

[9] (N.M. SUN PATH Consortium, 2017)

[10] (NMSU, n.d.)

[11] (UNM Health Sciences Center, n.d.)

[12] (Romero-Leggott, 2018)

[13] (Taylor, 2005)

[14] (EMNRD, 2018)

 

 


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